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02 November 2007 @ 02:03 am
Presenting with Asparagus  
Asperger's Quiz Question 39:

Do you enjoy mimicking animal sounds?


No...

Wait.


Yes.



EDIT: Do you sometimes have an urge to jump over things?


God yes. Sweet Jesus, I have Asperger's Syndrome.
 
 
 
aeduna: hotaeduna on November 1st, 2007 09:23 pm (UTC)
ha, reminds me of a quiz about dissociative disorders...
"Do you often arrive at locations with no idea how you got there?"

yes.
I was thinking.
Gadgegadge on November 2nd, 2007 07:52 am (UTC)
I have to say, I do identify with a few of the Asperger's symptoms myself. I sometimes feel like I only have social skills because I had to learn the rules from watching others and then try to apply them to situations, even if they don't quite fit.

Plus, apparently those with Asperger's are prone to, say, rambling on without awareness of the boredom levels of their audience. And I definitely feel I do that. :)
Nicole: snailmatcha_pocky on November 2nd, 2007 12:43 pm (UTC)
I don't think you have Asperger's, Julian :) I think you have about as much Asperger's as my fence-jumping urges make me have Asperger's :) You did learn the rules from watching. Asperger's people don't.

Now a freak or weirdo... I don't think that's really ruled out on either of our parts :)
Gadgegadge on November 2nd, 2007 08:21 pm (UTC)
Oh, I don't think I have Asperger's. I just see a couple of the symptoms in myself. My point about learning the rules is that my understanding of some with Asperger's is they can learn to do things like look people in the eye and so on, but they learn it as a, 'Oh, to fit in people look at each other directly!' kind of way. So it becomes like an externally applied rule on their interactions rather than something that just becomes part of their social discourse.
Because it's not about the nuances of eye contact, it's about trying to follow a rule that doesn't make any sense. I don't do that on a personal level. But on the bigger social scale? I do feel like I'm missing many of the pages from the rulebook.

But I'd rather walk on fences than jump them. :)
Nicole: pic#66367791matcha_pocky on November 4th, 2007 07:44 am (UTC)
I think that that pattern - of externally applied rules never becoming internally applied ones - is one of the core elements of most forms of autism. Autism is fundamentally a learning disorder. It's harder for an autistic person to integrate acquired information, particularly information that isn't easily quantified, into a schema for living.

The problem is of course, that if you stop paying attention to the rules for half a second, you fall out of the race, and have to work triple-hard to get back in. Nor does it help when most of your friends - i.e. the mirrors who provide the rules - are also freaks and weirdos with a touch of the Asperger's :)

I think the best indicator of whether someone has Asperger's or not is whether they understand how to flirt, and know when they're doing it. Social interaction doesn't get much more complicated and un-dissectable than that.